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Thursday, January 11, 2018

"Pasenture"

There is no actual present. It’s just the way reality is. It takes that long for our brains to process the instant. We’re always remembering events, and we’re always projecting some sort of future, and I think that’s that’s how we get meaning in our lives. ~  Christian Wiman

If poet Christian Wiman's statement above is true, which I suspect it is on a deep theoretical level, then where is the present moment that we are encouraged to live in and savor? Much of what I hear, read, and have written myself in the recent past suggests that most of us spend too much time in the mind of remembering and projecting. Could it be that the present we seek is actually that place of eternal transition where memory becomes projection? 

Instead of past, present, and future being divisions of linear time and space, perhaps they are actually part of a continuum much like any given point in a circle. In this way there is no past or future but only an eternal present. 

Maybe what we need is a new word that puts it all together like: "pastpresentfuture."  Better still take a bit of each, and shorten it to: "pasenture." Or maybe we already have the word: "now?"

Whatever we call it, the place in time and space when and where memory becomes projection truly does define our life, or as Mr Wiman says, gives us meaning. If so, then it would seem to me that who we are and will become is greatly determined by how we process our memory. However this is not just the memories of the mind, but also the deep memories of body and spirit that take us back into the earth and even beyond into a cosmic cloud of stardust.

"Pasenture" is a place of becoming who we are and always have been - wonderfully arranged bits of stardust with the amazing ability to be aware of it all.




Wednesday, January 3, 2018

Is it cold enough for you?

As I look at a weather map of North America on my computer this morning, I see most of the continent experiencing sub freezing temperatures. Televisions, front pages of newspapers, radios, the internet, office chatter, and check out line small talk are all abuzz about how cold we are.

Weather seems to be the only topic that most of us have in common anymore. This can be both good and bad. It's good because at least we do have a conversation starter. It's bad because too often it ends up being the only conversation.

Oscar Wilde once said, "Conversation about the weather is the last refuge of the unimaginative." In many ways this is true. I wonder how many times in my life I have missed opportunity of meaningful interaction and conversation with other people because I defaulted to the weather. On a larger scale, what important conversations in families and communities are not happening at the expense of small talk about weather (and I add sports, but that's another blog)?

However, on a day like today, or when tornados or hurricanes occur, the weather is important conversation because it means life or death for some people. Come to think of it, on a much larger scale, as we experience human induced climate change on our planet, maybe we should begin to take Mr. Wilde at heart by moving beyond "talking about" the weather and into more imaginative conversation about our primary human role as caretakers of one another and the only home we have.

In the meantime, stay warm today. And if you have opportunity, offer someone else warmth, whether literally or with meaningful conversation.